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Newsletter: January, 2008

EngineerAid


      EngineerAid Newsletter: January, 2008
Email: contact@engineeraid.com; Web: www.engineeraid.com Tel: +44 (0)131 455 6812

Dear Engineers, Supporters and Friends,

Happy New Year from everyone at EngineerAid!

As 2007 comes to a close and 2008 begins in earnest, here at EngineerAid we thought we'd look back at some of our past projects which our engineers have helped carry out. We are indebted to our engineers and volunteers who give us their time and energy and provide solutions to the technological problems in developing countries.

As you can see, a lot of good work has been done but we still need your help! Visit http://www.engineeraid.com/joinus.php to find out how to get involved or make a donation.

Let's make 2008 a year to remember!
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Damaged Houses from Excessive Rain - Uttranchal, India
EngineerAid helped a community in Uttranchal following heavy rains that had caused erosion and damage to houses.
After being contacted by the Rural Organisation for Social Elevation, around 40 engineers helped with the project by utilising only locally-sourced materials.
Within a week several solutions were reached, including a comprehensive guide on designing gabion walls to control erosion.
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Injured Birds Delhi, India
EngineerAid helped support the building of a large birdcage for injured birds after being contacted by Nadeem Shezad from "People For Animals in Delhi."
Each year, thousands of birds are severely injured or killed during Uttarayan, the annual kite- flying festival held in several provinces in India. Facilities to look after injured birds are badly needed.
Engineer Aid contacted over 50 engineers for this project and they were able to provide a suitable design for the birdcage.
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School Matopeni, Kenya
EngineerAid was contacted to provide an analysis of architectural plans for an important new school in Matopeni.
A local volunteer architect had devised plans for the school using local materials but wanted to take the plans to the next stage with valuable advice from a civil engineer.
Engineer Aid ensured that around 28 volunteer engineers were able to provide a detailed analysis of the plans and gave useful advice on the structure of the building.
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Hydroelectric Project - Tanzania
EngineerAid was contacted to help to establish the feasibility and cost of a mini- hydroelectric project so that a proposal could be put to a potential funder.
The project provided both vocational training and employment to vulnerable young people while helping the wider local community to break the cycle of poverty by producing high- quality agricultural tools at affordable prices.
EngineerAid contacted 10 volunteer engineers who were able to provide recommendations and a scoping document to help.
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Sand Water Dam - Laikipia, Kenya
The Loisukut community, an indigenous Maasai community in Laikipia-Kenya required assistance to construct a sand water dam from a seasonal river.
Engineer Aid contacted over 50 engineers who were able to recommend a stage-by-stage approach to construction, building about 2m height each year.
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Small Dam Koibatek District, RiftValley Province in Kenya
Local farmers wanted to harvest rainwater during the rainy season to irrigate horticultural crops and came to EngineerAid for advice on how to do so.
Initial plans included constructing small dams (by hand) and a drip irrigation system on their farms to aid the harvest of the water.
However, after careful consideration, our volunteer engineers were able to suggest some alternatives to hand constructed dams in light of the information available to them.
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Multimedia Centre Uvira, Congo
EngineerAid was contacted to help determine the size of generator needed to power a vital Internet centre in Uvira, Congo.

The centre is extremely important to ensure that the youth of Uvira aren't left behind in today's high-tech world.
A team of volunteer engineers have been working with MJA, a registered non-profit organization recognized by the Government of the DRC, to develop the training centre and it's hoped that the centre will help the community communicate with the outside world.

For more information about these stories and other projects we've worked on, please visit http://engineeraid.com/projects.php

Best Regards,
EngineerAid

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18th Jan 2008